Welcome

 
 


The North Carolina Correctional Association (NCCA) was established in August, 1979 as a state chapter affiliate of the American Correctional Association (ACA). ACA, a professional association dedicated to the improvement of corrections and the training and development of correctional professionals, was started in 1870. For more than 140 years, ACA has been on the forefront of exerting a positive influence on national correctional policy. ACA provides its member with educational materials, college and CEU credits with courses, training, seminars, publications, biannual conferences, accreditation services and a variety of other networking opportunities, not to mention a subscription to Corrections Today magazine and a wide variety of discounts. ACA has members in the United States, Canada, and other countries.

NCCA has eight regions in order to better serve its members. Each region elects officers who develop and sponsor activities such as annual training workshops and recognition events for members. NCCA represent all, from the line officer to the warden, from criminal justice student to the volunteer, from the probation officer to the day treatment social-worker, from the teacher to the healthcare practitioner – all across the corrections spectrum NCCA/ACA is there…

NCCA holds an annual statewide conference in November hosted by one of its regions. Events include skills training workshops; Exhibitors’ Hall, Exhibitors/President’s Appreciation dinner, and an awards appreciation during which members are honored for outstanding service.

Each year the NCCA provides scholarships to interested members and family member to assist in their educational needs. Our newsletter, The Compass, is printed yearly and distributed free to members.

The purposes of NCCA are to:

  • Exert a positive influence on the shaping of state and national correctional policy.
  • Promote the professional growth and development of its members.
  • Enhance interagency understanding and coordination.

NCCA is committed to strengthening corrections by providing a forum through which correctional professional, educators, students, volunteers, and interested citizens can participate. Through publications, workshops, and other activities, it works to stimulate constructive action on correctional issues and policies that can more effectively respond to the needs of the clients served and the members it represents and be the “voice in corrections.”